Perennials- Above their root zone, use 1/2 cup of worm castings per plant into the soil. Wield in spring and mid-summer.
Vegetables & Annuals (flowers)- till 2 lbs to every 10 square feet of soil. Till down no more than six inches. Only add castings where the plants and roots will be.
 
New seeds & Potted Plants- 1 part worm castings, 3 parts soil.
Established Hanging & Potted Plants- Top dress with 1-2 inches of worm castings. Reapply every 2 or 3 months.
New Lawns- Top-dress 10 pounds of castings for every 100 sq. ft. Water in well. Apply once every two years.
Established Lawns- Top-dress 10 pounds of castings for every 100 sq. ft. Apply once every two years.
Established Roses- For every plant, add 3-4 cups of worm castings and lightly till into soil.
New Roses, Trees, Berries, & Shrubs-  When planting or transplanting, mix 1 part to 3 parts soil. Apply in new dug hole and spread roots over the mix.
House plants- For small plants, add 1-2 tablespoons of worm castings to the surface. Water in well. For medium sized plants, add 2-4 tablespoons of worm castings to the surface, Water in well. For large plants, add 4-10 tablespoons of worm castings to the surface. Water in well. 

Results

Many scientific articles have been published on the topic of vermculture. All the results have been identical: vermicompost isn’t just evolutionary, but revolutionary. One article wrote: 

“Since the dawn of the green revolution, chemical fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides have been extensively applied, to increase the food productivity with the rising demand for food crops for the growing population... But the continuous and comprehensive use of chemical fertilizers impart various undesirable effects on the agricultural ecosystem like degradation of the soil, loss of crop genetics and microbial diversity, contamination of groundwater, and pollution of the atmosphere (Kaur et al., 2008 ;Chaudhry et al., 2009). Vermicompost, when applied to the soil, enhances soil microbial activities, which improves crop growth, inhibits the attack of pests and diseases and also improves soil physicochemical properties as well as biological activities (Pathma and Sakthivel, 2012 ; Bending et al., 2002). Thus, the application of…vermicompost, has become the need of the hour to rehabilitate the degraded lands.” 

Articles and References